Geoengineering

Geoengineering  is the scientific approach to large-scale alternations to the  environment to combat climate change. “Once considered the stuff of  wild-eyed fantasies, such ideas for countering climate change — known as geoengineering solutions, because they intentionally manipulate nature — are now being discussed seriously by scientists” (Fountain, 2014).

These approaches are significant and can be challenging but since  2014 there have been even more serious considerations to their use to  reduce climate change “One geoengineering approach would mimic this kind  of volcanic action by spraying sulfuric acid droplets into the  stratosphere.” (Fountain, 2014). These approaches would mimic natural  processes through man-created phenomenon’s in an attempt to counteract  global warming.

While ideas of geoengineering are potentially beneficial, they are  the second-best option to reduce climate changes, with the reduction of  fossil fuels use being the best option. “Strategies to remove carbon  dioxide from the atmosphere are limited by cost and technological  immaturity, but they could contribute to a broader portfolio of climate  change responses with further research and development.” (US National  Academy of Sciences, 2015). Some of the issues of geoengineering are the  ethical and environmental implications. Essentially, it is a very large  and risky proposal with many possible consequences that several  scholars agree are not yet fully understood or preventable. “If society  ultimately decides to intervene in Earth’s climate, any actions should  be informed by a far more substantive body of scientific research,  including ethical and social dimensions, than is presently available”  (US National Academy of Sciences, 2015); this suggest that future use of  geoengineering techniques could be used after more research.

Fountain, H. (2014, November 9). Climate tools seeking to take nature in hand (Links to an external site.) (Links to an external site.)The New York Times.

US National Academy of Sciences. (2015, February 10). Climate  intervention is not a replacement for reducing carbon emissions;  proposed intervention techniques not ready for wide-scale  deployment (Links to an external site.) (Links to an external site.)Press Release.